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Wednesday, September 06, 2006

LR on PP

Check out La Russophobe's latest contribution to Publius Pundit, a summary of the recent attack on the key independent newspaper Kommersant. The piece is paired with a complimentary item by Sean Guillory regarding the events and provides an opportunity for reader comment regarding these important breaking developments as the Kremlin continues its brutal crackdown on Russian media. The blogosphere is way out ahead of the mainstream press in recognizing and prominently reporting these events, to the shame of the Western newspapers (especially leading so-called liberal outlets like the New York Times and the Washington Post, which have yet to do anything with the story). Readers concerned about the fate of democracy in Russia (and in the world) should be writing letters to these newspapers calling for action.

2 comments:

Sean Guillory said...

Hey Kim,

Thanks for the plug! It's too bad both our articles haven't generated much discussion on Publius.

La Russophobe said...

Hi Sean,

My pleasure! Actually, you raise a topic which itself could be fodder for an article on your blog and/or mine and/or Publius, namely that crushing apathy of those inside and outside Russia where encroachments upon democracy are concerned. There are a wide variety of blog styles available yet we don't see enagement by those most affected by these policies. As for those outside Russia, it seems to me that psychological forces are in play, the Chamberlain Syndrome it might be called. Denial is another word. It's so much easier to imagine that Russia isn't really a problem, especially when there are so many other things to worry about. This phenomenon, of course, is a major boon to dictators, allowing them to consolidate their power in peace. Then too, so many Russia-watchers, especially the Russophiles, boldly and publicly declared that Russia could "never go back" that now they are probably quite reluctant to admit error and try to deal with the situation. Again, denial is so much more comfortable. In fact, I bet one could get a whole book out of this topic.

Of course, it's only among Russia watchers that the significance of Kommersant is known and understood, so its hard to get lay people to realize the seriousness of this situation. On top of that the paper has hoards of enemies who are only to glad to see it go. I guess we must vow to keep the world's feet to this fire! For my part I undertake to do so.

KZ