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Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Yes, Even on Cheery Cooking Shows Neo-Soviet Russia is Exposed

La Russophobe is a fan of cooking shows, and one of her very favorites is Scandinavian Cooking, hosted by a little Norwegian elf named Andreas Viestad, one of the most charming and adorable young fellows LR has ever come across.

In one of the programs, entitled "Artic Cuisine with a Russian Twist," Andreas visits the Svalbard Archipelago above the artic circle, where Norway has a sizeable community, to do some cooking in the ice. Andreas couldn't be cuter, decked out in a huge floppy fur hat.

Andreas is gets a major downer, however, when he visits a community of Russians living on the archipelago; he notes with dismay that "despite the change in government in Russia" the people he finds continue to live in a pathetic, crude Soviet style, without any of the standard elements of civilization enjoyed by the prosperous Norwegians. His pity for the hapless, backward Russians, who seem trapped in a time warp, is palpable.

One daren't imagine what he would think if he went to Chelyabinsk.


Sergey Romanov said...

Er, sorry, but what does a bunch of Russian citizens* do living in Norway? Sorry, if I'm a lil' bit skeptical of _that_ ;-)


* "Anyone who holds a Russian passport is a Russian. The term "Russian" properly has no racial or religious aspect of any kind."

La Russophobe said...

I guess they are doing the same thing that thousands of Russian citizens are doing in the United States, including many illegal aliens. Ever heard of Brighton Beach?

Incidentally, Svalbard isn't "Norway" proper. It has a special type of status.

We're glad to see you use the term "Russian" as it should be used. But in fact, for the vast majority of people holding Russian passports, "Russian" means "Slavic" and it's used in a highly racist manner by most Russians. In fact, Russians have two different words for "Russian" that can't really be translated into English -- one meaning Slavic and one meaning not.